Get rid of DateTime in PHP.

For the majority of date operations in PHP, we typically use the DateTime functions. The dates in the PHP DateTime are mutable. It might be confusing to use mutable dates, and they can cause unforeseen issues in your code. We address mutable date problems and potential fixes in this blog.

Problem with DateTime

The $today date echo statement should be placed before the modify() and add() functions as a quick workaround.

<?php
  $today_date = new DateTime();
  $tomorrow_date = $today_date->modify('+1 day');
  echo "Today: " . $today_date->format('Y-m-d');
  echo "<br>";
  echo "Tomorrow: " . $tomorrow_date->format('Y-m-d');
?>

You will receive the same date for today and tomorrow if you run the aforementioned code. DateTime instances have been updated as a result of the modify return. It will convert the $today date object to the $tomorrow date because of mutability. echo statement so returns the same date.

perhaps a problem with the alter DateTime function. Try some other DateTime operations. Using the DateTime->add() function is our next example.

<?php
$today_date = new DateTime();
$tomorrow_date = $today_date->add(new DateInterval('P1D'));
echo "Today: " . $today_date->format('Y-m-d')."\n";
echo "Tomorrow: " . $tomorrow_date->format('Y-m-d');
?>

The same date is also returned by the previous example. Therefore, if you use mutable DateTime, you will obtain the same instance.

How to solve this problem

The $today date echo statement should be placed before the modify() and add() functions as a quick workaround.

<?php
$today_date = new DateTime();
echo "Today: " . $today_date->format('Y-m-d');

$tomorrow_date = $today_date->modify(‘+1 day’).”\n”; echo “Tomorrow: ” . $tomorrow_date->format(‘Y-m-d’);
?>

But we are constantly unable to use the above fix. because we occasionally need to give views values. Both will have the same date at that time.

Clone an object in PHP

By using PHP object cloning, the problem can be resolved. Try cloning the DateTime object now using the clone keyword. Then edit or add your modifications.

<?php
$today_date = new DateTime();
$tomorrow_date = (clone $today_date)->modify('+1 day'); echo "Today: " . $today_date->format('Y-m-d')."\n";
echo "Tomorrow: " . $tomorrow_date->format('Y-m-d');
?>

Cloning objects adds needless complexity and noise to your code. It’s also challenging to constantly call on clones. This problem affects more than only the edit() and add() routines. You will experience the same problem with the DateTime routines below.

  • sub
  • setDate
  • setISODate
  • setTime
  • setTimezone
  • modify
  • add

DateTimeImmutable

The only difference between the DateTimeImmutable class and DateTime is that new objects are returned when modification methods like DateTime::modify() are performed. The DateTimeImmutable class debuted in PHP version 5.5.

From the DateTimeInterface interface, the DateTime and DateTimeImmutable are implemented.

DateTime libraries

One of the top DateTime libraries is PHP Carbon. Additionally, the carbon offers the CarbonImmutable object. Therefore, if you’re using the Carbon library, utilise the immutable object.

<?php
$mutable = Carbon::now();
$modifiedMutable = $mutable->add(1, 'day');
echo $mutable->isoFormat('Y-M-D')."\n";
echo $modifiedMutable->isoFormat('Y m D')."\n";$immutable = CarbonImmutable::now();
$modifiedImmutable = CarbonImmutable::now()->add(1, 'day');
echo $immutable->isoFormat('Y-M-D')."\n";
echo $modifiedImmutable->isoFormat('Y m D')."\n";
?>$modifiedMutable = $mutable->add(1, 'day');
$modifiedImmutable = CarbonImmutable::now()->add(1, 'day');
?>

Conclusion

In order to prevent certain mistakes with a changeable DateTime, think about utilising the immutable DateTime object. Use the mutable object if necessary; otherwise, use the DateTimeImmutable.

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